?

Log in

No account? Create an account

On Vacations - Life is strange...

Apr. 21st, 2006

12:03 pm - On Vacations

Previous Entry Share Next Entry

Hello,

I don't like scheduling vacations. I usually like vacations once I'm on them, but I find the process of scheduling them excruciating.

So, back to vacations.

When we think about vacations we need to figure out, at a minimum:

Let's just say that dealing with time and scheduling isn't my very strongest suit, so it isn't easy for me. Add to that problem that I like to nail down the variables before making a decision, and that my girlfriend's work by necessity schedules her time several months in advance, and you can see that scheduling vacations wouldn't tend to be my favorite thing.

Then there's the question: what do we expect to get out of the vacation--here are some possibilities:

I'm sure there are innumerable other things that we could get out of a vacation, but you get the gist.

Part of what makes planning vacations so difficult is that we get so little time for them. This in turn can lead to a great deal of expectation, importance and meaning that weighs down the vacation itself. It's so short that we tend to try to make it perfect, instead of just flowing with whatever happens. I know people who have reportedly spent an entire vacation thinking things like: "this train is late", "why can't it be sunny", "it looked way better on the web site", and the like. This doesn't lead to happy vacations or happy memories of them either.

This year many of my girlfriend's girlfriends are getting married, plus she's in the "hazing" part of her career--so she's on call a lot and has less vacation than she will later on. So practically all "vacation" is tied up in these friends' weddings. So it's much more stressful than just going to a resort or some such.

This was much more rambling than usual, my apologies.

Live well, generalist

Tags:
Current Location: SF Bay Area
Current Mood: peevish
Current Music: none

Comments:

[User Picture]
From:xeger
Date:April 22nd, 2006 01:16 am (UTC)
(Link)
Interesting. My vacations are pretty much always intermingled with work anyways - the idea of going to a resort seems outright peculiar. Huh.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:generalist
Date:April 22nd, 2006 06:41 am (UTC)
(Link)

I try to avoid combining vacations with work. I find that I don't get much vacationing done, just work, when I set them up as combined deals. And then I'm cranky and resentful, which I try to avoid.

Cheers!

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:shadowsmark
Date:April 22nd, 2006 03:38 am (UTC)
(Link)
Remember, Jesus wasn't the only person the Romans crucified. So it's not clear, really, how much religious overtone the word had initially. (And you know you can always interest me in this stuff!)

As for the rest of it, if I wanted to go on a vacation with my sweetie, my only options would be times chosen by my exhusband! So I find it hard to sympathize.....
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:shadowsmark
Date:April 22nd, 2006 05:46 am (UTC)
(Link)
Ah, I'm sorry: I shouldn't be unsympathetic. Just envious.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:generalist
Date:April 22nd, 2006 06:46 am (UTC)
(Link)

You can be envious, so can I. It's not very useful, though.

Cheers!

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:generalist
Date:April 22nd, 2006 06:45 am (UTC)
(Link)

I know that Jesus of Nazareth wasn't the only person the Romans crucified. But by now he is by far the best known. This was very likely at the time of the entry of the word in question into English. I'm betting that that happened well after the fall of Rome, and well after Christianity was prevalent in France. And the Norman invasion by France of England happened in 1066 AD, if I remember correctly. There wasn't much, if any, Latin in the then-prevalent precursor of English yet.

Cheers!

(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:jymdyer
Date:April 22nd, 2006 07:22 am (UTC)

The Crux of the Matter

(Link)
=v= Hang out with linguists; they love this "cruc" stuff. I stumped K. tonight because she didn't know the root of fiscal off the top of her head. :^)
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]
From:shadowsmark
Date:April 25th, 2006 06:52 am (UTC)

A ha!

(Link)
I remember why I've been particularly dubious of the claim of religious roots to the use in English of "excruciate." The verb was well-used in Latin, and appeared in this poem by Catullus, my favorite Roman poet:

Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris?
Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

(Loosely translated: I hate and I love. Why do I do that, you might ask? I don't know, but I really feel and it's killing me. --"excrucior" would literally translate "I am excruciated/crucified".)

Catullus lived comfortably BCE, so certainly didn't choose that word based on any religious allusions; his works were read through the ages, so it's reasonable to assume that educated people (who might use such a word) were comfortable with it as a Latin (Roman) word, rather than a Late Latin (Church-influenced) one.

Thanks! I haven't done enough etymological sleuthing recently!

(Reply) (Thread)