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Cool beans (almost literally) - Life is strange...

Mar. 18th, 2004

11:21 am - Cool beans (almost literally)

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Hi!

I'm not really into gardening. I used to say that I was really NOT into gardening. Then every once in a while I read things like this and I think about how gardening could be really great! Even if I would have to deal with dirt (ok, we can call it soil, maybe that'll make it better).

I love Brussels Sprouts. Look at these!

-(Cheers) generalist

Current Mood: happyhappy
Current Music: The SugarCubes / Coldsweat

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From:xeger
Date:March 18th, 2004 08:37 pm (UTC)
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You'd like to soil yourself??? :)
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From:generalist
Date:April 1st, 2004 11:05 pm (UTC)
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Hi!

In fact, I do like a good chicken liver from time to time. Said cooking would have to be at your place; the lingering odor from the cooking of chicken livers would be too much for (specific other people to stand at) my place.

-(Cheers) generalist

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From:generalist
Date:April 1st, 2004 11:09 pm (UTC)

The name "brussel sprouts"

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Hi!


Could the content of this quote have something to do with it? "They were a popular vegetable crop in Belgium during the sixteenth century from which they were spread to the surrounding countries throughout temperate Europe," taken from here.


-(Cheers) generalist

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From:selkiediver
Date:March 18th, 2004 11:16 pm (UTC)
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Mmmm. Brussel sprouts. I love brussel sprouts! They do very well in cool weather. I did not tend to mine very well this winter. In fact, I think only two sprouted and then the rains drowned them (that's my story and I'm sticking to it!). I will try again next winter given the opportunity.

Here is a history of brussel sprouts:

Brussel sprouts, Brassica oleracea var gemmifera, are known to be native to cool regions in northern Europe.  They were a popular vegetable crop in Belgium during the sixteenth century from which they were spread to the surrounding countries throughout temperate Europe.  French settlers in Louisiana extensively cultivated brussel sprouts for its continuous production of miniature cabbages throughout the growing season.
    The origin of Brasssica oleracea var gemmifera is thought to be the result of a  mutation from the savoy cabbage, Brassica olearcea capitata L. sabuda subgroup.  Two main types of brussel sprouts have arisen:  the tall variety, standing 2 to 4 feet tall, and the short variety, growing to a maximum height of 2 feet. The preferred size of the sprouts varies with Europeans opting for sprouts ½ inch in diameter, while Americans prefer sprouts 1 to 2 inches in diameter.
    Most of the breeding work with brussel sprouts has occured in Europe. US hybrids are primarily from European introduction focus on uniformity, vigor and disease resistance.  Some of the standard varieties grown today have been in production for a long time.  ‘Catskill’ (also known as Long Island Improved) is a dwarf variety with medium sprout size coming into maturity 85-95 days after transplanting.  ‘Jade Cross’ (F1 hybrid) is a compact variety of a bluish-green color, medium size sprouts come into harvestable maturity 85-90 days after transplanting.  ‘Jade Cross E’ (hybrid) is taller and has more uniform sprout growth than the F1 hybrid.  Some other dwarf cultivars are ‘Early Morn Dwarf Improved,’ and ‘Friither Zwerg Kvik.’
    In regions with a longer growing season, taller cultivars are preferred. Many of these are specific to European countries.  Some of the earlier cultivars are ‘Breda’ and ‘Weibulls Rapid'.  ‘Red Vein,’ ‘Hild’s Idea,’ and ‘Deroshy Amager’ are some of the later maturing, more hardy cultivars.
    Commercial production of brussel sprouts began in the US in 1925 in the Louisiana delta, and by 1939 had moved to mid coastal California with limited production in New York state. In 1997, 4,200 acres of brussel sprouts were harvested in California.  Total weight harvested was 630,000 cwt (150 cwt/acre) with a total value of $26,800,000.


Hmmmmm.....brussel sprouts. Too bad they don't like summer.
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From:selkiediver
Date:March 19th, 2004 01:09 am (UTC)
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You should come see my neighbor's house. While he actually has a sizable yard, his garden is quite compact. No chickens, though. It's gorgeous and he grows just about everything in it (he has everything from lemons to arugula, basil to mustard, and zuchini to kumkuats. He also has olive trees, but that's a bit down the hill). I envy him his garden. Fortunately, he lets me come raid....I mean visit his garden and he also helps me out with mine. If you are interested in visiting, let me know and I'll drop him a line...though you might want to wait until after planting occurs. (:
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From:xthread
Date:March 22nd, 2004 06:28 am (UTC)
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Cool. I'd never looked at the plant that one of my favorite foods comes from.
(Hmmm, steamed brussel sprouts in butter and pepper. Yumm!)
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